Apple and Sloe Overnight Oats Cake

We’ve had a pot of sloes in the fridge destined for Sloe Gin but the requisite gin has yet to be bought. Needing to use them up, I wondered if baking would make these mouth-puckeringly sour fruit more edible.

So I added the sloes to an oat-based cake I’ve been trying out using Grown in Totnes oats. Surprisingly they lost much of their astringent sharpness and were a lovely addition to this cake which I’ve also made with blackberry and apple and roasted rhubarb.

If de-stoning sloe sounds way too fiddly, you could just use apple in the cake. Then make a simple syrup with the sloes and pour over the top. As the last wild fruit of the season, it feels good to use what we have growing around us.

 

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Ingredients

  • 150g oats
  • 150ml milk (any kind)
  • 175g sugar
  • 175g butter
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 175g flour (I used spelt)
  • 3tsp baking powder
  • 2-300g apple, chopped
  • 100g sloes, stones removed

Method

  • Put the oats in a bowl and cover with the milk. Leave to soak for an hour or so, or overnight
  • Preheat the oven to 180°C
  • Cream the butter and sugar
  • Add the eggs and beat together
  • Add the flour and baking powder and mix well
  • Fold in the apple and sloes
  • Pour the batter into a large prepared cake tin (22cm). Top with sliced apple or sloes.
  • Bake for 1hr – 1&1/4 hrs or until a skewer comes out clean
  • Leave to cool slightly before turning out

 

A little bit more…..

If you’ve forgotten to get the butter out of the fridge, as I frequently do, you could also melt the butter with the sugar in a pan over a gentle heat first. Leave to cool slightly before adding the eggs then continue as above

Any fruit can be used, sharp flavours work well with the oats

Vanilla, cinnamon or ginger add lovely additional  flavours

This works well as a tray bake, halving the baking time to around 30mins

 

 

 

 

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Raspberry and Elderflower Drizzle Cake

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I never once encountered Elderflower in Japan so it was a delight to be reacquainted with these beautiful frothy heads of pollen and pretty little blooms.  I recently made some elderflower syrup, with only Rapadura sugar to hand the resulting syrup is earthy brown in colour and not as delicate as it could be. My kids weren’t too impressed, so I began to think of alternative ways to use it.

This is a twist on my favourite lemon drizzle adding summer raspberries and using elderflower syrup on top. It’s what I call a ‘saucepan cake’. Instead of creaming the butter and sugar first (which requires you to be organised enough to take the butter out of the fridge in advance) the butter is melted with the sugar in a pan. I then use the same pan to mix the other ingredients (I even stick it on the electric scales to weigh the flour) meaning just the pan and baking tin to wash up at the end.

My children were much more impressed with this.

Ingredients

  • 200g butter
  • 180g sugar (I use Rapadura)
  • 200g self-raising flour (or plain spelt with baking powder)
  • Zest of one lemon
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 punnet raspberries
  • 3 – 4 tbs elderflower syrup

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 180C
  • Melt the butter and sugar in a pan over a gentle heat
  • Take off the heat to cool slightly
  • Add the lemon zest and one tbs of elderflower syrup, crack in the eggs and beat well
  • Add the flour and mix to make smooth batter
  • Break the raspberries into smaller pieces
  • Pour a third of the cake mixture into a prepared loaf tin
  • Sprinkle over some raspberries pieces, repeat and finished with raspberries on top (they mostly sink but some might remain)
  • Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until a skewer comes out clean
  • While still warm prick all over with a skewer or fork and spoon over the remaining elderflower syrup
  • Leave to cool in the tin

 

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